A Bright Tomorrow - The September Edition

Updated: Sep 16

A Note From The Editor



When Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, announced in March that the UK would be entering a national lockdown, we couldn’t have foreseen the extremity of the situation. With Covid19 taking hold of the world with an iron grip, society was plunged into a waiting game; when and how we will surface from the pandemic is still unknown. For around six months our world irrevocably shrunk, with graduations, birthday parties and even school lessons taking place behind a screen. For perhaps the first time – certainly in my lifetime – the value of community was questioned, re-defined and appreciated unlike ever before. We understood how it felt to feel lonely. We understood the gravity of friendship and family. We understood the fear of living amongst uncertainty.  Yet whilst we may have hit pause on our own lives, the world itself is incapable of pausing. Domestic abuse, famine, conflict and racism amongst other issues do not stop for a pandemic and for many people, the reality of their lives worsened as they struggled to survive both Covid19 and these injustices. On 25th May, George Floyd, a 46-year-old black American man was suffocated and consequently murdered in Minneapolis by Derek Chauvin, a white police officer, sparking what was the world’s biggest civil rights movement. In Yemen, the country is enduring the world’s largest humanitarian crisis, with more than 24 million people – 80 percent of the country’s population – in need of help. In China, Uighur Muslims are being forcibly detained in ‘re-education centres’ where they are subject to torture, forced abortions and forbidden to practice their culture. In Chechnya, the LGBTQ+ community are the victims of persecution, with many of the community’s members being sent to prison camps where they too are subject to beatings. Here in the UK, one domestic abuse call was made to police every thirty seconds in the first seven weeks of lockdown. Climate change is still a very real threat. How society chooses to emerge post-pandemic is entirely our choice. We have an unprecedented chance to reshape civilization, with the pandemic revealing flaws in the existing system. People say that mankind forgets easily; that we are too quick to return to the comfort of what we already know, but today we have an opportunity to make a brighter future. During lockdown, life was undoubtedly put into perspective. I ask that we don’t lose this perspective, but rather we continue to see the world for what it is and the long road that we still have ahead of us. Individually, we all have a personal responsibility to ‘do our bit’ – a Bright Tomorrow is a collective effort. Once a month, we will be turning our focus to current global injustices, whether that be the refugee crisis, racism or homophobia, and we aim to amplify the voices of the victims of these injustices by showcasing their talents, stories and enterprises. In the scheme of things, A Bright Tomorrow is a small blog, but we have a huge goal: to redefine what society really means. Mankind will always have its differences, but we all partake in the culture of humanity, and human decency, respect for human rights and the capacity to fight against the injustices of others, is a culture we should all share, regardless of our differences. With this, I warmly welcome you to our community. Together, we can make a bright tomorrow.

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